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T-Mobile iPhone Finally Confirmed, Radical Price Tag

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Well here’s come good news for T-Mobile subscribers. The CEO of T-Mobile has said that they will have the iPhone next year and he went on to say that T-Mobile would sell the device is very different way than other carriers.

T-Mobile iPhone confirmed for 2013, won’t follow typical $199 base price

T-Mobile will be doing away with subsidies in 2013 and this will mean that customers would have to pay the whole cost of the device upfront, buy it over installments or bring in their own device which is unlocked.

T-Mobile will make the move to unsubsidised plans, while at the same time offering their customers cheaper rates for data and voice calls. Carriers usually offer subsidies with their contracts. This means that you are essentially mortgaging the iPhone.

T-Mobile said that during the last quarter around 80% of their activations were on their value plans and due to this fact the carrier believes that there will be a lot of demand for their iPhone.

The cost of the device if it is unsubsidised will be a lot. Typically the iPhone 5 will cost around $650 to $850, depending on which of the models is chosen. The main reason why the iPhone 5 has been so popular is that carriers are able to give customers subsidies on the handset which means the cost can be as low as $200.

T-Mobile will have to make customers see that they will be able to save money when they take out a contract over two years as they will pay a lower plan rate on the value plan. However whether they will be able to pull this off remains to be seen as they would have to sell hard as the iPhone 5 (or possibly iPhone 6) comes with a large price tag attached to it.

T-Mobile has said they have something up their sleeves as Legere said that they may heavily finance the iPhone and sell it for $99 while charging customers around $15 to $20 each month over the 20 month period.

So while T-Mobile is to get the iPhone, the only question now is when?

Mike is the man who reviews gadgets that aren’t mainstream or products that can’t exactly be classified as consumer electronics e.g. portable talking toilets. It’s always interesting to read about the crazy products we have here in Asia that just don’t get as much publicity as they warrant.