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2018 Honda Accord: Biggest Loser Against Civic & CR-V

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Since it was first launched in the late 1970s, there have been approximately 13 million units of the Honda Accord sold.

In its lifetime, it has often been the best-selling car in the US and despite its Japanese origins, there have been more than 10.5 million Accords manufactured Stateside since the early 1980s.

Times have changed, however, with passenger cars currently on the decline in the US market. Mid-size sedans in particular have been hit the hardest by the recent boom in demand for pickup trucks and SUVs, leaving nameplates like the Accord and its closest rival Toyota Camry struggling to attract buyers.

The Accord may have been the best retail-selling car in the US since 2013, but it’s no longer Honda’s most popular model, having lost that title to the tenth-gen Honda Civic last year as it experienced a total sales decline of 2.9 percent against 2015.

And now that the fifth-gen CR-V has hit the market in full force, it appears that the Accord is falling even further. Last month’s sales saw the sedan fall to third spot in Honda’s lineup, with the Civic in second spot and the redesigned CR-V as the new sales leader for the brand.

That shouldn’t be a surprise given the fresh buzz surrounding CR-V. But one look at where the auto market it headed in the next few years and it seems that even the next-gen Accord – arriving for 2018 with a sporty new look and a new turbo engine to boot – may not be able to dethrone the CR-V as Honda’s commercial torch-bearer.

At the rate that crossovers and SUVs are growing in the American market – thanks in large part to the fall of gas prices – and how automakers have been responding to this drastic shift in demand, the CR-V rides on a much stronger wave than its sedan siblings.

Do you think the Honda Accord could return to being Honda’s most popular nameplate among buyers when it receives in overhaul for next year? Would sedans and other passenger cars regain traction with consumers in the next several years?

Always looking for something new to learn, Mario looks at the internet as one big startup. With him at the helm, Autoomobile.com continues to head in the right direction of providing high quality and unbiased information on the latest new car models and electronics.

2 Comments

  1. Walter Peterson

    February 11, 2017 at 8:39 am

    I would have bought a 2017 Accord Hybrid if it had Low Speed Follow. The CR-V & Civic both have it. My daily commute more or less requires this safety feature. I’ll wait until the 2018 rolls it in, otherwise I’ll get in line for a new Tesla.

  2. Walter Peterson

    February 11, 2017 at 8:40 am

    I would have bought a 2017 Accord Hybrid if it had Low Speed Follow. The CR-V & Civic both have it. My daily commute more or less requires this safety feature. I’ll wait until the 2018 rolls it in, otherwise I’ll get in line for a new Tesla.